PRIMARY BYTE

First appeared in Anglican Cyber Tuesdays 14/05/2019. 

When you have a tricky situation or decision to make online try this:

  • Think about your options.
  • Evaluate what would happen if you followed each of these options.
  • Choose the best option with the best outcome for yourself and any other people involved.
  • Ask for assistance, as some choices maybe hard and you maybe unsure what to do.  You should speak with a trusted adult who can help you in real life such as your teacher, parents or carers.

Examples of good choices are:

  • Not clicking on links.
  • Not forwarding hurtful memes on.
  • Asking fellow students if they need help.
  • Reporting inappropriate content to an adult.
  • Not answering friend requests from people who you don’t know or are unsure about.

Some factors that may make it hard for you to make a good decision when interacting with friends are:

•      not wanting an argument.

•      not thinking through consequences.

•      not wanting to lose friends.

•      not thinking about how it may make the other person feel.

Something to think about is that poor choices can not only affect you; it can affect others e.g. your family, friends and the school. The effect is like a ripple of a stone in a pond. And, sometimes something about them (e.g. a photo or comment) may be seen years later and define what other people think of you.

Everyone makes mistakes. Sometimes a real apology can be a helpful way to respond when you have done the wrong thing and you certainly can learn from you mistakes.  You can leverage those around you so you can learn from your mistakes by:

  • Seeking help from a trusted adult like your teacher or parents and carers.
  • Getting help online with Kidshelpline webchat or phone 1800551800
  • Goto the eSafety Commissioner’s website kids section at eSafety.gov.au/kids
  • Look for counselling and support services with
  1. Beyond blue
  2. Lifeline
  3. 1800respect  

Source: Making good choices online ACPPS055, ACPPS054 and ACTDIP022